Crab Nebula


When a star dies in a violent, fiery death, it spews its innards out across the sky, creating an expanding wave of gas and dust known as a supernova nebula. Arguably, the most famous of these supernova remnants is M1, also called the Crab Nebula, a blob-like patch visible in low-powered binoculars.





Image credits: space.com




Crab Nebula, (catalog numbers NGC 1952 and M1), probably the most intensely studied bright nebula, in the constellation Taurus, about 6,500 light-years from Earth. Roughly 10 light-years in diameter, it is assumed to be the remnant of a supernova (violently exploding star) observed by Chinese and other astronomers first on July 4, 1054. The supernova was visible in daylight for 23 days and at night for almost 2 years. There are no records of its observation at the time by Europeans.





The Crab is one of the few astronomical objects from which radiation has been detected over the entire measurable spectrum, from radio waves through infrared and visible wavelengths to ultraviolet, X-rays, and gamma rays. In the late 1960s the Crab pulsar (NP 0532), thought to be the collapsed remnant of the supernova, was discovered near the centre of the nebula. The pulsar, which flashes in radio, visible, X-ray, and gamma-ray wavelengths at 30 times per second, provides the energy that allows the nebula to glow.


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